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Hitting Cages for Baseball, Softball, Golf or Cricket

Hitting cages are becoming more popular for a variety of sports – from baseball & softball, to cricket & golf. Practice Sports can custom build the ideal hitting cage to fit your application perfectly. Whether it’s in your garage, basement, backyard, shed, barn, or commercial training facility – our builders have the experience to design a hitting cage to any size, shape, or spec.

Most common styles

Fully Enclosed Hitting Cages

A fully enclosed hitting cage includes 4 net walls & a ceiling piece, completely sewn together to form a single unit. Our builders sew a 3/8″ thick rope border along all edges and in the middle on the top. These ropes offer an attachment point & reinforcement at the net seams. Simply open the package, un-roll, allow to acclimate to your temperature, and connect the net to your over-head hardware. No stitching or sewing required! Fully enclosed hitting cages are typically used for baseball, softball, or golf practice – but can be used for variety of sports & applications – from track & field hammer / discus / shot-put containment, and even animal containment.

Hitting Cage

Fully enclosed Hitting Cage

Open Sided Hitting Cages

Hitting cages with an open side / end are very popular for golf practice, and also becoming more popular for cricket practice. Golf hitting cages allow the player to stand in the open area swinging towards the enclosed end – seemingly self-explanatory but just so you can’t say we didn’t warn you!

Cricket players typically use the cage in the opposite direction – mainly because toilet water circles in the opposite direction in Australia – something about the equator. Regardless, these open-ended hitting cages works great for cricket cages as well.

Open sided hitting cages can even be used during baseball or softball practice, as a backstop behind the batter. They also work great for tee and/or soft-toss practice. The batter can set-up the tee just inside the enclosed area and hit balls towards the back end. A baffle impact net or rubber impact screen is recommended to shield & preserve the netting in the high-impact zone.

Open-sided Hitting Cage

Open-sided Hitting Cage

Hitting Cage Materials

There are a variety of materials available to be used to design your hitting cage. This is the most important decision, to ensure proper containment, safety, and long life-span.

Netting Mesh Size:

It’s critical that you select the proper mesh size. The key is to consider the SMALLEST object you will need to contain. If you may want to use the cage for golf someday, you will need to order smaller mesh than you would if you only planned to use it as a baseball or softball hitting cage.

Netting Gauge:

It’s key to order the proper gauge for your application. Consider the following: Age of players, planned usage, preferred life-span, and environment.

If your hitting cage is only for little league players in your own backyard, then a #21 material would be suitable. If it will be a high-school team hitting cage, then a minimum of #36 is recommended. If this will be a pro / commercial facility hitting cage, #60 is highly recommended. If your hitting cage will be used in a wet or humid climate, you should consider adding a water-proof treatment to attain max life-span.

Ultimately the heavier the gauge you select, the longer it will last. This seems like common sense, but you “get what you pay for”, and the price is very proportional to the life-span of the net. When shopping for pro quality netting you may get “sticker shock”, but you must take into consideration the expense of replacing a net after a short period of time – there are costs associated with your hitting cage being unavailable, and a cost for re-installation. Not to mention the safety risk of a compromised net. Ordering inferior netting for a higher level of use is a serious safety risk.

 

Feel free to contact us today to discuss designing a custom hitting cage to fit your needs. Our team of experts have years of experience working with netting for hitting cages, and can walk you through the entire netting material selection & ordering process.

 

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